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Victorian Interfaith Networks Conference (VINC) - 24 November 2013 : select your 10/04/2013 06:35:39
    

The 2013 Victorian Interfaith Networks Conference (VINC) Is being held on Sunday 24 November from 12:30pm to 5pm. A Grass Roots Conference organised by the Faith Communities Council of Victoria (FCCV) and hosted in 2013 by Moonee Valley Interfaith Network (MVIN) & Moonee Valley City Council (MVCC). The Conference aims to help build the capacity and sustainability of existing multifaith/interfaith networks, bring people up-to-date with current multifaith/interfaith matters, provide networking opportunities, and assist the hosting interfaith network/council to promote its work to the local community. Location : Flemington Community Centre 25 Mt Alexander Road, Flemington (Melway ref: 2A D1) Date : Sunday 24November 2013 Time : 12:30pm - 5:00pm (arrival from 12:30pm for 1:30pm start) Programme Schedule: 12:30pm: Arrival and seating. Faith stands open for viewing. 1:30pm: Talks and performances relating to Indigenous Spirituality 2:30pm: Workshops on Interfaith/Multifaith Matters* 3:30pm: BREAK 3:50pm: Repeat of Workshops on Interfaith/Multifaith Matters* 4:40pm: Group Activity 5pm: Summary and Close * Attendees who register for the Conference will also have the opportunity to enrol into particular workshops (there will be six workshops to choose from, and people can enrol into a maximum of two). PLEASE SEE BELOW FOR DOWNLOADABLE - registration, workshop topics & complete programming schedule . C ontact Sandy Kouroupid...
Victorian Interfaith Networks Conference (VINC) - 24 November 2013 : select your 10/04/2013 06:34:48
    

The 2013 Victorian Interfaith Networks Conference (VINC) Is being held on Sunday 24 November from 12:30pm to 5pm. A Grass Roots Conference organised by the Faith Communities Council of Victoria (FCCV) and hosted in 2013 by Moonee Valley Interfaith Network (MVIN) & Moonee Valley City Council (MVCC). The Conference aims to help build the capacity and sustainability of existing multifaith/interfaith networks, bring people up-to-date with current multifaith/interfaith matters, provide networking opportunities, and assist the hosting interfaith network/council to promote its work to the local community. Location : Flemington Community Centre 25 Mt Alexander Road, Flemington (Melway ref: 2A D1) Date : Sunday 24November 2013 Time : 12:30pm - 5:00pm (arrival from 12:30pm for 1:30pm start) Programme Schedule: 12:30pm: Arrival and seating. Faith stands open for viewing. 1:30pm: Talks and performances relating to Indigenous Spirituality 2:30pm: Workshops on Interfaith/Multifaith Matters* 3:30pm: BREAK 3:50pm: Repeat of Workshops on Interfaith/Multifaith Matters* 4:40pm: Group Activity 5pm: Summary and Close * Attendees who register for the Conference will also have the opportunity to enrol into particular workshops (there will be six workshops to choose from, and people can enrol into a maximum of two). PLEASE SEE BELOW FOR DOWNLOADABLE - registration, workshop topics & complete programming schedule . C ontact Sandy Kouroupid...
Victory over caged eggs. Congratulations to Woolworths on its decision. Big Thank You 10/04/2013 06:32:27
    Click here to share this victory on facebook! Woolworths will phase out cage eggs over five years, but you can help chickens today! Click here to read our no-nonsense guide to eggs and understand what labels really mean for hens. Dear Miss Eagle, Today is a historic day for hens — and you made it possible! Supermarket giant Woolworths has announced a complete phase out of cage eggs over the next five years. And what motivated them to free battery hens from cages? You. Woolworths says that rising consumer concern for animals is the primary motivator behind today's landmark announcement. If ever there was a sign that the key to ending factory farming rests in the hands of informed consumers — this is it. Animals Australia's Make it Possible campaign has already reached millions of Australians with the truth about cage eggs and factory farming. And we'll continue to expose these cruel industries until every animal is freed from factory farms. Your generous support can help free animals even sooner. Miss, this is yet another nail in the coffin of factory farming. Thank you, on behalf of hens everywhere, for making it possible. Lyn White Campaign Director P.S. If you haven't yet, please take a few minutes today to watch and share the life-changing 'Make it Possible' film . Together, we will make a world without factory farming possible! Donate now — Watch the film — Learn more Tha...

Victory over caged eggs. Congratulations to Woolworths on its decision. Big Thank You to Animals Australia
Victory over caged eggs. Congratulations to Woolworths on its decision. Big Thank You 10/04/2013 06:31:27
    Click here to share this victory on facebook! Woolworths will phase out cage eggs over five years, but you can help chickens today! Click here to read our no-nonsense guide to eggs and understand what labels really mean for hens. Dear Miss Eagle, Today is a historic day for hens — and you made it possible! Supermarket giant Woolworths has announced a complete phase out of cage eggs over the next five years. And what motivated them to free battery hens from cages? You. Woolworths says that rising consumer concern for animals is the primary motivator behind today's landmark announcement. If ever there was a sign that the key to ending factory farming rests in the hands of informed consumers — this is it. Animals Australia's Make it Possible campaign has already reached millions of Australians with the truth about cage eggs and factory farming. And we'll continue to expose these cruel industries until every animal is freed from factory farms. Your generous support can help free animals even sooner. Miss, this is yet another nail in the coffin of factory farming. Thank you, on behalf of hens everywhere, for making it possible. Lyn White Campaign Director P.S. If you haven't yet, please take a few minutes today to watch and share the life-changing 'Make it Possible' film . Together, we will make a world without factory farming possible! Donate now — Watch the film — Learn more Tha...

Victory over caged eggs. Congratulations to Woolworths on its decision. Big Thank You to Animals Australia
Changing Gears Ballarat book event with Greg Foyster on Thursday 10/02/2013 06:14:17
    

From Facebook Thursday 12:00 Collins Ballarat, 222 Sturt Street, Ballarat Meet Greg Foyster and Sophie Chishkovsky as they cycle into town to talk about the new book Changing Gears: A Pedal-Powered Detour from the Rat Race. Changing Gears is a high-spirited adventure book charting Greg Foyster’s remarkable, life-transforming cycling challenge he undertook with his girlfriend Sophie from Hobart to Cairns on a quest to find out if we can be happier with less. Cycling for more than 8 months and 6500 kilometres, Greg and Sophie conducted over 80 in-depth interviews with lone visio naries and engaged communities alike, all seeking a more sustainable life. There’s the barefoot monk who walked from Gold Coast to Townsville with only three robes and an alms bowl, the man who lived in the bush for 20 years without electricity and went on ‘historical treks’ using 18th century tools and clothing, the ‘modern swagman’ who wandered the highway for three decades, and many more DIY downshifters with fascinating stories to tell. Changing Gears also features exclusive interviews with leading figures in the environment movement, including David Holmgren, Clive Hamilton and Costa Georgiadis. Greg and Sophie are now on a 60-day pedal-powered book tour from Melbourne to Sydney. Don’t miss out on this chance to hear Greg and Sophie's fascinating stories of life on the road. For a full tour itinerary, visit www.simplelives.com.au/ tour . The book is available in all Dymocks sto...
Dale Hess Calendar - 13-09-30 : Films galore; Festival of Ideas; Human Rights 09/30/2013 06:28:14
    

Booked out: Tuesday 1 October, 6 pm - 8.30 pm: Festival of Ideas: Human Rights, Social Equity and Health: An Australasian Pulse Check . Speakers: Ian Anderson, Chair; Marcia Langton, Papaarangi Reid, Arnold Zable, Julian Burnside, Joy Murphy Wandin . Venue : Carillo Gantner Theatre, University of Melbourne . Website: Opening Night - Human Rights, Social Equity and Health: An Australasian Pulse Check Tuesday 1 October, 6.30 pm for 7 pm: Herb Feith Memorial Lecture: Democracy in Indonesia Revisited . Speaker: Prof. Edward Aspinall , Australian National University . This lecture will revisit some of the analyses made at that conference in the light of Indonesia 's contemporary democratic transformation. How does contemporary Indonesian democracy compare with that of the 1950s? Approaching contemporary Indonesian democracy in this way, it is hoped, will throw new light both on its well-known failings and its surprising achievements. Venue: Building H, Level 1, Rm 116, Monash Caulfield. RSVP for catering purposes by 24 September 2013 . Wednesday 2 October, 9.30 am - 8 pm: Festival of Ideas: Environments . See website for programs and speakers: http://ideas.unimelb.edu.au/events . Venue: Carillo Gantner Theatre, University of Melbourne . Wednesday 2 October, 6 pm shared meal; 7.30 p...
Dale Hess Calendar - 13-09-30 : Films galore; Festival of Ideas; Human Rights 09/30/2013 06:28:14
    

Booked out: Tuesday 1 October, 6 pm - 8.30 pm: Festival of Ideas: Human Rights, Social Equity and Health: An Australasian Pulse Check . Speakers: Ian Anderson, Chair; Marcia Langton, Papaarangi Reid, Arnold Zable, Julian Burnside, Joy Murphy Wandin . Venue : Carillo Gantner Theatre, University of Melbourne . Website: Opening Night - Human Rights, Social Equity and Health: An Australasian Pulse Check Tuesday 1 October, 6.30 pm for 7 pm: Herb Feith Memorial Lecture: Democracy in Indonesia Revisited . Speaker: Prof. Edward Aspinall , Australian National University . This lecture will revisit some of the analyses made at that conference in the light of Indonesia 's contemporary democratic transformation. How does contemporary Indonesian democracy compare with that of the 1950s? Approaching contemporary Indonesian democracy in this way, it is hoped, will throw new light both on its well-known failings and its surprising achievements. Venue: Building H, Level 1, Rm 116, Monash Caulfield. RSVP for catering purposes by 24 September 2013 . Wednesday 2 October, 9.30 am - 8 pm: Festival of Ideas: Environments . See website for programs and speakers: http://ideas.unimelb.edu.au/events . Venue: Carillo Gantner Theatre, University of Melbourne . Wednesday 2 October, 6 pm shared meal; 7.30 p...
Some of the food plants in my garden - late September 09/29/2013 07:42:07
    

My peas look gorgeous in this container - the white flowers which will soon produce peas are most satisfying I have quite a few broad bean plants in the ground This mint - the plain old mint - is in a pot. But I also have some in the ground in a place where I hope it takes over and chases the weeds away. Ditto for some After Dinner Mint. Thank you for being a part of The Network. Be the change you want to see.
...in 20 years the proportion of Aboriginal people custody has grown from one in se 09/29/2013 04:53:28
    

The ethics of paternalism in Aboriginal policy 3 Comments Callum Denness | 24 September 2013 Following the abuse received by Adam Goodes from a teenage spectator in the AFL's Indigenous round, and the subsequent remarks made by Eddie McGuire, the country became embroiled in a debate about racism in modern Australia. The debate was about words — 'ape' was the pejorative used by the Collingwood spectator — and in our rush to condemn, defend or make sense of the ensuing debate yet more words were spilled across newspaper columns, blog posts, broadcast media and social media. Meanwhile, the Northern Territory introduced its Mandatory Alcohol Treatment Bill which, if passed, will see more Aboriginal people incarcerated. We were too busy describing the modern face of racism to notice. The importance of words cannot be diminished but newspapers and bulletins can hold only so many. While plenty were dedicated to the story of McGuire, the teenage girl and Goodes, none mentioned that in 20 years the proportion of Aboriginal people held in custody has grown from one in seven to one in four. The introduction of laws which would criminalise alcohol consumption and introduce more Aboriginal people to jail made the news but did not incite the passions of the commentariat or public, being devoid of sport stars and television personalities. PLEASE READ MORE HERE Thank you for being a part of The Network. Be the change you want to see.
...in 20 years the proportion of Aboriginal people custody has grown from one in se 09/29/2013 04:53:05
    

The ethics of paternalism in Aboriginal policy 3 Comments Callum Denness | 24 September 2013 Following the abuse received by Adam Goodes from a teenage spectator in the AFL's Indigenous round, and the subsequent remarks made by Eddie McGuire, the country became embroiled in a debate about racism in modern Australia. The debate was about words — 'ape' was the pejorative used by the Collingwood spectator — and in our rush to condemn, defend or make sense of the ensuing debate yet more words were spilled across newspaper columns, blog posts, broadcast media and social media. Meanwhile, the Northern Territory introduced its Mandatory Alcohol Treatment Bill which, if passed, will see more Aboriginal people incarcerated. We were too busy describing the modern face of racism to notice. The importance of words cannot be diminished but newspapers and bulletins can hold only so many. While plenty were dedicated to the story of McGuire, the teenage girl and Goodes, none mentioned that in 20 years the proportion of Aboriginal people held in custody has grown from one in seven to one in four. The introduction of laws which would criminalise alcohol consumption and introduce more Aboriginal people to jail made the news but did not incite the passions of the commentariat or public, being devoid of sport stars and television personalities. PLEASE READ MORE HERE Thank you for being a part of The Network. Be the change you want to see.
Northern Territory Intervention revisited - along with more children stolen from their 09/28/2013 19:22:18
    

Picture from the Remote Indigenous Gardens Network Before the Intervention, before all the work stopped in our community, I used to work as a nutritionist at the Family Centre. But there’s nothing here now any more. We used to provide food and I would encourage all the young mothers. How to look after their kids, how to make sure were fed healthy food. But now it’s gone, we never got an explanation why. It’s hard for the young mothers now. If their little babies don’t put on weight for two or three weeks, they’ll be taken away from their mother’s arms by welfare. I’ve seen it. It’s really sad for me because when I was working here I used to encourage them. Now they get no encouragement. There’s just a report typed into the computer for welfare. For Aboriginal people, this thing is coming back for us. Stolen Generation. Taking kids away from own mother. And that’s really sad. It’s really no good. It’s not just happening here, it’s happening everywhere in our communities. This testimony is from a strong Aboriginal woman in a remote community in the Northern Territory. It was given in the spring of 2011 when her people were preparing for a festival and protest. She had worked as a nutritionist, a vital service in a poverty-stricken community where raising children is a daily struggle. Cuts to the Community Development Employment Projects (CDEP) program closed the service down. The cuts began with the Northern Territory Intervention. Plea...
Hope in the art - means hope in the heart 09/27/2013 05:49:47
    

FROM HERE Thank you for being a part of The Network. Be the change you want to see.
Green Left Weekly Activist Calendar - 2013-09-25 09/25/2013 07:34:49
    

. Green Left Weekly Activist Calendar September 25, 2013 Socialist Alliance Grand Final party Saturday, September 28, from 12 noon (kick off is at 2:30pm). Being an AFL fan is not a prerequisite to come along and enjoy some great company, home fired pizzas, competitions, prizes (oh . . . and the game, of course!). 1 Gilbert St, Coburg. A short walk from Coburg station, just off Reynard/Berry Streets. RSVP for catering purposes to 0400 320 602 or email Susan Price . Rally: 30 years but still no justice! Stop Aboriginal deaths in custody! Saturday, September 28, 12 noon. Remember John Pat and the hundreds who have died in custody since! State Library of Victoria, 328 Swanston St, City. Organised by Indigenous Social Justice Association. Red Cinema: AZADI: Oppression, detention, asylum, hope, faith, freedom Thursday, October 10, 7pm (meal from 6pm). Every year, thousands of people set sail for Australian shores seeking asylum, seeking protection, seeking freedom. Azadi follows the plight of an Afghani schoolteacher and his asthmatic son, who escape their oppressive homeland only to encounter another kind of persecution upon arrival in Australia. This short film will be introduced by a refugee activist. Afterwards there will be time for a discussion of the refugee policies of the Abbott government afterwards.$10/$6. Resistance Centre, level 5, 407 Swanston St, City (opposite RMIT). For more in...
The long arm of justice reaches out to Ponce from Pinochet to the present and perhaps to 09/20/2013 14:41:37
    

Privatization Profiteers from Pinochet’s Chile May Yet Face Prison by Pratap Chatterjee , CorpWatch Blog September 19th, 2013 Julio Ponce, the billionaire owner of Sociedad Quimica & Minera de Chile (SQM), faces ten years in prison for insider trading . A beneficiary of former dictator General Augusto Pinochet, Ponce is charged with buying company shares at below market prices and selling them at a profit. SQM – often referred to as Soquimich - is one of the world’s biggest producers of potassium nitrate, iodine and lithium which it produces with raw materials sourced from its caliche ore and brine mines in the Atacama desert. Originally a state enterprise, SQM was privatized by Pinochet in 1988 at the bargain basement price of $120 million on the advice of the International Monetary Fund (IMF). The man in charge of privatization in Chile was Ponce, who trained as a forestry engineer, but had the good fortune of marrying Veronica Pinochet, the daughter of the president. Pinochet appointed Ponce to the board of SQM before it was privatized. “ Call it business savvy plus political connections on overdrive ,” writes Erin Carlyle at Forbes magazine. Ponce became president of the privatized nitrate company in 1987. Several of his relatives became major stockholders and had positions on the board of directors of the company. Today SQM is worth $9.2 billion. Ponce has 84.1 million shares in the company, according to SQM filings with the Securities and...
Ranger, your time is up NOW! 09/20/2013 14:41:33
    The article below is from Tracker The picture below is from here Debate warming up over Ranger mine future BY TRACKER , SEPTEMBER 20, 2013 NORTHERN TERRITORY: The operators of the Ranger uranium mine in the Northern Territory have unveiled a new water processing machine they say will give it a future beyond 2021. But not everyone’s happy. Mining has been completed at the site, which is located within – but is not a part of – the world heritage-listed Kakadu National Park, 260km southeast of Darwin. It’s operated by Energy Resources Australia (ERA), which is owned by Rio Tinto. The $220 million brine concentrator unveiled on Thursday will improve the mine’s ability to treat water and to progressively rehabilitate the site by 2026, when it must be of a standard to be reintegrated to Kakadu. Traditional owners and environmental groups want to see ERA exit in 2021. But if a second project currently in exploration turns out to be feasible, the brine concentrator may help them stay on if the relevant parties can be convinced it’s possible to mine in an environmentally safe way. ERA’s chief executive Rob Atkinson says it’s too early to talk about future negotiations with stakeholders and the local community. But he notes that previous attempts to treat water to a high standard were either too small for requirements or unsuccessful. “This is the first time in ERA’s history producing very clean water at the quality we need,” he says. “Without...

Ranger, your time is up NOW!
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