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The History Ring - This ring celebrates History, historical events, figures and fields. This Ring is designed to be seen by all ages. You m

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The History Ring

 Subrings: World War II History   Egyptian History  
Manager: thehistoryring
This ring celebrates History, historical events, figures and fields. This Ring is designed to be seen by all ages. You must have detailed historical information, or links to sites which do, on your website in order to join the Ring. "Commercial" sites are not encouraged, and must have a considerable amount of detailed information on their site to qualify for membership. The address you list on your application MUST be the page where you will place the Ring's HTML code.

 

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Domestic Life in 11th Century England - 06/11/2013
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/28157/28157-h/images/img046.jpg

Drinking Glass in Medieval England The cultivated land was surrounded either by wood or by pasture and open commons. Every cottager kept his hive of bees, to produce the honey which was then used as we now use sugar, and drove his swine into the woods to fatten on the acorns and beech nuts which strewed the ground in the autumn. Sheep and cattle were fed on the pastures, and horses were so abundant that when the Danish pirates landed they found it easy to set every man on horseback. Yet neither the Danes nor the English ever learnt to fight on horseback. They rode to battle, but as soon as they approached the enemy they dismounted to fight on foot. The huts of the villagers clustered round the house of the lord. His abode was built in a yard surrounded for protection by a mound and fence, whilst very great men often established themselves in burhs, surrounded by earthworks, either of their own raising or the work of earlier times. Its principal feature was the hall, in which the whole family with the guests and the thegns of the lord met for their meals. The walls were covered with curtains worked in patterns of bright colours. The fire was lighted on the hearth, a broad stone in the middle, over which was a hole in the roof through which the smoke of the hall escaped. The windows were narrow, and were either unclosed holes in the wall, or covered with oiled linen which would admit a certain amount of light.  In a great house at meal-time boards were brought forward and...

Domestic Life in 11th Century England



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