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The History Ring - This ring celebrates History, historical events, figures and fields. This Ring is designed to be seen by all ages. You m

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The History Ring

 Subrings: World War II History   Egyptian History  
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This ring celebrates History, historical events, figures and fields. This Ring is designed to be seen by all ages. You must have detailed historical information, or links to sites which do, on your website in order to join the Ring. "Commercial" sites are not encouraged, and must have a considerable amount of detailed information on their site to qualify for membership. The address you list on your application MUST be the page where you will place the Ring's HTML code.

 

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English Towns and Shires in the Middle Ages - 02/05/2013
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-BaBfRv31gx8/UO2ee4P836I/AAAAAAAACJI/PpTTP2MIEbQ/s200/monk_and_king.jpg

The towns had grown up in various ways. Some were of old Roman foundation, such as Lincoln and Gloucester. Others, like Nottingham and Bristol, had come into existence since the English settlement. Others again gathered round monasteries, like Bury St. Edmunds and Peterborough. The inhabitants met to consult about their own affairs, sometimes in dependence on a lord. Where there was no lord they held a court which was composed in the same way as the hundred-moots outside. The townsmen had the right of holding a market. Every sale had to take place in the presence of witnesses who could prove, if called upon to do so, that the sale had really taken place, and markets were therefore usually to be found in towns, because it was there that witnesses could most easily be found.   Shires, which were divisions larger than the hundreds, and smaller than the larger kingdoms, originated in various ways. In the south, and on the east coast as far north as the Wash, they were either old kingdoms like Kent and Essex, or settlements forming part of old kingdoms, as Norfolk (the north folk) formed part of East Anglia, and Dorset or Somerset, the lands of the Dorsætan or the Somersætan, formed part of the kingdom of Wessex. In the centre and north they were of more recent origin, and were probably formed as those parts of England were gradually reconquered from the Danes. The fact that most of these shires are named from towns—as Derbyshire from Derby, and Warwickshire from Warwick...

English Towns and Shires in the Middle Ages



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